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dc.contributor.authorCrook, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-03T13:58:35Z
dc.date.available2020-01-03T13:58:35Z
dc.date.issued2011-11
dc.identifier.citationCrook. R. (2011) 'The state and accessible justice in Africa: is Ghana unique?', Policy Brief 3, Africa Power and Politics Programme (APPP), Overseas Development Instituteen
dc.identifier.urihttps://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/20.500.12413/14963
dc.description.abstractThe provision of legitimate and accessible justice for its citizens is one of the fundamental duties of a well-governed state. But throughout Africa the institutions of state justice are struggling to overcome problems of overload and delay, perceptions of corruption and popular distrust. Current policy prescriptions to improve access to justice are dominated by the belief that non-state, customary or informal ‘alternative dispute resolution’ (ADR) systems provide the best solutions. But research by Africa Power and Politics (APPP) in Ghana challenges this new orthodoxy. The findings suggest that the state can and does provide ADR-type accessible justice at local level that aligns with popular beliefs and expectations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOverseas Development Instituteen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAfrica Power and Politics Programme (APPP) Policy Brief;3
dc.rights.urihttps://www.ids.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse2018.pdfen
dc.subjectPolitics and Poweren
dc.titleThe State and Accessible Justice in Africa: is Ghana Unique?en
dc.typeOtheren
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The author.en
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten
rioxxterms.versionNAen
rioxxterms.funder.projectd218e59e-c0fb-4cb3-8a07-92a57da72cd1en


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