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dc.contributor.authorIsmail, Zenobia
dc.coverage.spatialLatin Americaen
dc.coverage.spatialSub-saharan Africaen
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen
dc.coverage.spatialUgandaen
dc.coverage.spatialJordanen
dc.coverage.spatialAsiaen
dc.coverage.spatialGhanaen
dc.coverage.spatialKenyaen
dc.coverage.spatialAfghanistanen
dc.coverage.spatialAlbaniaen
dc.coverage.spatialAngolaen
dc.coverage.spatialAzerbaijanen
dc.coverage.spatialBangladeshen
dc.coverage.spatialBeninen
dc.coverage.spatialBhutanen
dc.coverage.spatialBotswanaen
dc.coverage.spatialBrazilen
dc.coverage.spatialBurkina Fassoen
dc.coverage.spatialBurundien
dc.coverage.spatialCambodiaen
dc.coverage.spatialCameroonen
dc.coverage.spatialCape Verdeen
dc.coverage.spatialChileen
dc.coverage.spatialColombiaen
dc.coverage.spatialDRCen
dc.coverage.spatialCosta Ricaen
dc.coverage.spatialDominicaen
dc.coverage.spatialDominican Republicen
dc.coverage.spatialEcuadoren
dc.coverage.spatialEl Salvadoren
dc.coverage.spatialEthiopiaen
dc.coverage.spatialFijien
dc.coverage.spatialGabonen
dc.coverage.spatialGambiaen
dc.coverage.spatialGuatemalaen
dc.coverage.spatialHondurasen
dc.coverage.spatialIndiaen
dc.coverage.spatialJamaicaen
dc.coverage.spatialKazakhstanen
dc.coverage.spatialLiberiaen
dc.coverage.spatialNepalen
dc.coverage.spatialNamibiaen
dc.coverage.spatialMozambiqueen
dc.coverage.spatialMoroccoen
dc.coverage.spatialMaldivesen
dc.coverage.spatialMauritiusen
dc.coverage.spatialMalawien
dc.coverage.spatialNicaraguaen
dc.coverage.spatialNigeren
dc.coverage.spatialNigeriaen
dc.coverage.spatialPanamaen
dc.coverage.spatialPapua New Guineaen
dc.coverage.spatialParaguayen
dc.coverage.spatialPeruen
dc.coverage.spatialRwandaen
dc.coverage.spatialSierra Leoneen
dc.coverage.spatialSolomon Islandsen
dc.coverage.spatialSouth Africaen
dc.coverage.spatialSamoaen
dc.coverage.spatialSenegalen
dc.coverage.spatialSurinameen
dc.coverage.spatialSwazilanden
dc.coverage.spatialTanzaniaen
dc.coverage.spatialTajikistanen
dc.coverage.spatialThailanden
dc.coverage.spatialTogoen
dc.coverage.spatialTongoen
dc.coverage.spatialTrinidad and Tobagoen
dc.coverage.spatialTurkeyen
dc.coverage.spatialTurkmenistanen
dc.coverage.spatialUgandaen
dc.coverage.spatialUruguayen
dc.coverage.spatialUzbekistanen
dc.coverage.spatialVanuatuen
dc.coverage.spatialVenezuelaen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.coverage.spatialYemenen
dc.coverage.spatialZambiaen
dc.coverage.spatialZimbabween
dc.coverage.spatialArgentinaen
dc.coverage.spatialTunisiaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T14:48:09Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T14:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationIsmail, Z. (2018). A Mapping of Larger Youth Employment Programmes in Developing Countries. K4D Helpdesk Report. Birmingham are UK: University of Birminghamen
dc.identifier.urihttps://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/20.500.12413/14199
dc.description.abstractThis rapid literature review combines academic and grey literature to identify larger youth employment programmes in developing countries. The review identifies the countries, which have a national youth policy. There is no literature that assesses the sustainability of national youth policies. Rather, the literature makes general statements regarding the issues that governments should address in their national youth policy. The literature makes little reference to the scale of youth employment programmes and consequently there is no consensus regarding the criteria for determining which interventions are large in terms of scale. However, larger youth employment programmes tend to derive all or some of their funding from domestic governments (Fox & Kaul, 2017; Kluve et al., 2016). The literature concentrates on explaining the root causes of youth unemployment and advocating for holistic policy responses from national governments, which address both supply and demand side constraints on youth employment in developing countries (Filmer & Fox, 2014; Pieters, 2013). There are several impact assessments of youth employment interventions and a few comprehensive meta-analysis studies, which compare findings across a range of interventions. However, there is little mention of scale with regard to youth employment programmes. There is consensus in the literature that youth employment programmes which are partly or fully funded by domestic governments tend to be large-scale (Fox & Kaul, 2017; Kluve et al., 2016). The key findings from an analysis of Youth Policy Lab database are: Only 50% of countries in the world have national youth policies, National youth organisations are widespread in Europe and Oceania (over 90%) while they are found in 63% of African countries and in less than half the countries in Asia (49%) and the Americas (47%) (Youth Policy Press, 2014); and over 90% of the countries have a national youth authority (usually a ministry or department) and there are no differences across regions (Youth Policy Press, 2014).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIDSen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesK4D Helpdesk Report;469
dc.rights.urihttps://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/en
dc.subjectChildren and Youthen
dc.subjectEconomic Developmenten
dc.subjectFinanceen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectWork and Labouren
dc.titleA Mapping of Larger Youth Employment Programmes in Developing Countriesen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.rights.holder© DFID - Crown copyright 2018.en
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
rioxxterms.funderDepartment for International Development, UK Governmenten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectK4Den
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.funder.project238a9fa4-fe4a-4380-996b-995f33607ba0en


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    K4D supports learning and the use of evidence to improve the impact of development policy and programmes. The programme is designed to assist the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) and other partners to be innovative and responsive to rapidly changing and complex development challenges.

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