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dc.contributor.authorMutahi, P
dc.contributor.authorKimari, B
dc.coverage.spatialKenyaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-29T09:27:44Z
dc.date.available2017-08-29T09:27:44Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.citationMutahi, P. and Kimari, B. (2017) The Impact of Social Media and Digital Technology on Electoral Violence in Kenya, IDS Working Paper 493, Brighton: IDSen
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78118-381-6
dc.identifier.issn2040-0209
dc.identifier.urihttps://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/20.500.12413/13159
dc.description.abstractElectoral violence has become synonymous with Kenya’s elections. This acquired deadly proportions during the 2007 elections. However, it was also during this time that social media and digital technology was first used for political reasons including campaigning and polling. Social media and digital technology had mixed uses where it was not only used to propagate hate speech and mobilise for violence, but also to identify and map out violence hotspots. Since then, they have increasingly become an indispensable tool in Kenya’s politics and governance, used by political leaders to spread information, campaign and mobilise. However, the widespread reach of social media has also been a major challenge to security, peace and peacebuilding since it has been used to incite hatred and violence. This paper identifies the specific threats that social media and digital technology pose and opportunities they present for violence prevention. Ultimately, the paper seeks to present the opportunities that exist for partnerships between state and non-state actors to effectively prevent political and electoral violence.en
dc.description.sponsorshipESRCen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIDSen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDS Working Paper;493
dc.rightsAll rights reserved. Reproduction, copy, transmission, or translation of any part of this publication may be made only under the following conditions: • with the prior permission of the publisher; or • with a licence from the Copyright Licensing Agency Ltd., 90 Tottenham Court Road, London W1P 9HE, UK, or from another national licensing agency; or • under the terms set out below. This publication is copyright, but may be reproduced by any method without fee for teaching or nonprofit purposes, but not for resale. Formal permission is required for all such uses, but normally will be granted immediately. For copying in any other circumstances, or for re-use in other publications, or for translation or adaptation, prior written permission must be obtained from the publisher and a fee may be payable.en
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen
dc.subjectConflicten
dc.subjectPolitics and Poweren
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.titleThe Impact of Social Media and Digital Technology on Electoral Violence in Kenyaen
dc.typeIDS Working Paperen
dc.rights.holderIDSen
dc.identifier.teamConflicten
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.funder.projectd218e59e-c0fb-4cb3-8a07-92a57da72cd1en


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