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dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, John
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Hubert
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialHong Kongen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSingaporeen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSouth Koreaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialTaiwanen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialMalaysiaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialIndonesiaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialThailanden_GB
dc.coverage.spatialPhillippinesen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialCambodiaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialLaosen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialMyanmaren_GB
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-11T12:53:05Z
dc.date.available2014-07-11T12:53:05Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationHumphrey, J. & H. Schmitz (2007) China : its impact on the developing Asian economies. Working paper series, 295. Brighton: IDS.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/4183
dc.description.abstractThe rapid growth of East Asia, with China at its centre, has attracted global attention. Many authors have emphasised the emergence of regional production systems and the spread of high rates of growth across a large number of Asian economies. Nevertheless, the East Asian regional production system has not benefited all countries in the region equally. The more advanced Asian economies (Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan) and the ASEAN-4 economies (Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines) have a very different economic relationship in China compared with the poorer countries of the Greater Mekong Subregion (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam). While the former have benefited from complementarities with China, supplying parts and components to largely export-oriented assembly plants, the latter are selling raw materials and resource-based products to China. China’s growth offers many opportunities for other Asian countries to accelerate their growth. Making use of these opportunities for purposes of income generation of poor people requires prioritising two policy areas. The first is connectivity. Some parts of Asia remain poorly connected to this regional production system. Better infrastructure and better trade links are key to enhancing the growth and incomes in these parts of Asia. The second priority is enhancing sustainability. The poorer Asian countries have increased exports to China, but much of this resource-based export growth is unsustainable. Sustaining and increasing trade between China and these countries has the potential to be more effective than increasing aid for the pursuit of poverty reduction and improved welfare in the poorer countries of the region. However, these countries will only benefit from the dynamism of the East Asian regional economy if policy initiatives directly address the issue of sustainability of resource extraction. These initiatives need to be taken not only in the exporting countries, but also in China itself. Keywords: regional integration; value chains; East Asia; economic development.en_GB
dc.publisherIDSen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDS working papers;295
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectEconomic Developmenten_GB
dc.subjectPovertyen_GB
dc.subjectTradeen_GB
dc.titleChina : its impact on the developing Asian economiesen_GB
dc.rights.holderInstitute of Development Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.koha172175


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