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dc.contributor.authorLeach, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorMearns, Robinen
dc.contributor.authorScoones, Ianen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-24T15:21:27Z
dc.date.available2016-02-24T15:21:27Z
dc.date.issued01/10/1997en
dc.identifier.citationLeach, M., Mearns, R. and Scoones, I. (1997) Institutions, Consensus and Conflict: Implications for Policy and Practice. IDS Bulletin 28(4): 90-95en
dc.identifier.issn1759-5436en
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/9186
dc.description.abstractSummary This article reflects on the challenges faced when the ideal of consensual communities is questioned. A more complex view of institutional relationships at the local level is envisaged, one which emphasises conflict as much as consensus. This, in turn, suggests some implications for institutional design and processes of conflict negotiation. A number of alternatives are explored, ranging from targeted, institutional design to more flexible, learning process approaches. Support for effective negotiation processes is highlighted, including the enhancement of claims?making capacity through processes of participation and empowerment. Due to the inherent uncertainties in both ecological and social dynamics, institutional design can never take a blueprint form. Instead, a flexible, adaptive style of dealing with institutional complexity and uncertainty is envisaged. Despite the necessity of disagreggating ‘community’ imagery for local?level implementation, such imagery can also be used strategically and effectively by local people and other development actors in struggles to define and direct processes of change. ancement of claims?making capacity through processes of participation and empowerment. Due to the inherent uncertainties in both ecological and social dynamics, institutional design can never take a blueprint form. Instead, a flexible, adaptive style of dealing with institutional complexity and uncertainty is envisaged. Despite the necessity of disagreggating ‘community’ imagery for local?level implementation, such imagery can also be used strategically and effectively by local people and other development actors in struggles to define and direct processes of change.en
dc.format.extent6en
dc.publisherInstitute of Development Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDS Bulletin Vol. 28 Nos. 4en
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen
dc.titleInstitutions, Consensus and Conflict: Implications for Policy and Practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holder© 1997 Institue of Development Studiesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1759-5436.1997.mp28004010.xen


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