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dc.contributor.authorBloom, Gerald
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Annie
dc.contributor.authorTomson, Goran
dc.contributor.authorAwor, Phyllis
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xiulan
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Syed Masud
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Wasif Ali
dc.contributor.authorBlessing, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorWang, Li
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Xiaoyun
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-19T12:08:42Z
dc.date.available2015-06-19T12:08:42Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBloom, G., Wilkinson, A., Tomson, G., Awor, P., Zhang, X., Ahmed, S. M., Khan, W. A., Blessing, V., Wang, L., Liang, X. and Peterson, S. (2015) Addressing Resistance to Antibiotics In Pluralistic Health Systems, S TEPS Working Paper 84, Brighton: STEPS Centreen
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78118-228-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/6416
dc.description.abstractThere is growing international concern about the threat to public health of the emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to existing antibiotics. An effective response must invest in both the development of new drugs and measures to slow the emergence of resistance. This paper addresses the former. It focuses on low and middle-income countries with pluralistic health systems, where people obtain much of their antibiotics in unorganised markets. There is evidence that these markets have enabled people to treat many infections and reduce mortality. However, they also encourage overuse of antibiotics and behaviour likely to encourage the emergence of resistance. The paper reviews a number of strategies for improving the use of antibiotics. It concludes that effective strategies need measures to ensure easy access to antibiotics, as well as those aimed at influencing providers and users of these drugs to use them appropriately.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for work on this paper was provided by a grant by the UK ESRC to the STEPS Centre and a grant by the UK Department for International Development to the Future Health Systems Consortium.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSTEPS Centreen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSTEPS Working Paper;84
dc.rightsUsers are welcome to copy, distribute, display, translate or perform this work without written permission subject to the conditions set out in the Creative Commons licence. For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work. If you use the work, we ask that you reference the STEPS Centre website (www.steps-centre.org) and send a copy of the work or a link to its use online to the following address for our archive: STEPS Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK (steps-centre@ids.ac.uk)en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.titleAddressing Resistance to Antibiotics in Pluralist Health Systemsen
dc.typeSeries paper (IDS)en
dc.identifier.externalurihttp://steps-centre.org/publication/amr/en


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Users  are  welcome  to  copy,  distribute,  display,  translate  or  perform  this  work  without  written  permission  subject  to  the  conditions  set  out  in  the  Creative  Commons  licence.  For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work. If you use the work, we ask  that you reference the STEPS Centre website (www.steps-centre.org) and send a copy of the work or  a  link  to  its  use  online to the  following  address  for our  archive:  STEPS  Centre, University of  Sussex,  Brighton BN1 9RE, UK (steps-centre@ids.ac.uk)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Users are welcome to copy, distribute, display, translate or perform this work without written permission subject to the conditions set out in the Creative Commons licence. For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work. If you use the work, we ask that you reference the STEPS Centre website (www.steps-centre.org) and send a copy of the work or a link to its use online to the following address for our archive: STEPS Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK (steps-centre@ids.ac.uk)