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dc.contributor.authorMazinza Kawana, Beatrice
dc.contributor.authorJ. Mofu, Musonda
dc.contributor.authorSiamusantu, Ward S.
dc.contributor.authorKabwe, Kabaso F.
dc.contributor.authorBwalya, Bupe B.
dc.contributor.authorTembo, Gelson
dc.contributor.authorGoulden, Jay
dc.contributor.authorBanda, Levyson
dc.coverage.spatialZambiaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-11T11:06:45Z
dc.date.available2014-09-11T11:06:45Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-11
dc.identifier.isbn978 1 78118 181 2
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/4386
dc.description.abstractThe overall objective of this DFID-funded study was to understand whether cash or food transfers were more effective for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in improving nutrition, health status and adherence to ART. HIV-positive individuals initiating ART at the St Francis Mission Hospital in Katete District, Eastern Province, were randomly allocated to two treatment groups (cash and food), and given a food basket or its cash equivalent monthly, for eight months. Both treatment groups saw significant increases (p-value <0.001) in Body Mass Index (BMI), Household Dietary Diversity Score, good adherence to ART, and in mean CD4 count, but there were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in these measures. The study concluded that the provision of cash or food for eight months when clients start ART confers similar and significantly positive effects in improving clients’ nutrition and health. Providing cash is likely to be more cost-effective.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSpecial Collection;
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access report distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original authors and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen_GB
dc.titleCash or Food? Which Works Better to Improve Nutrition Status and Treatment Adherence for HIV Patients Starting Antiretroviral Therapyen_GB
dc.typeSeries paper (IDS)en_GB
dc.rights.holderInstitute of Development Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.teamKnowledge Servicesen_GB


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