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dc.contributor.authorKaplinsky, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Mike
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialLesothoen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSwazilanden_GB
dc.coverage.spatialMadagascaren_GB
dc.coverage.spatialKenyaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSouth Africaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSudanen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialAngolaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialDemocratic Republic of Congoen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialSierra Leoneen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialNamibiaen_GB
dc.coverage.spatialMozambiqueen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-02T12:44:45Z
dc.date.available2014-07-02T12:44:45Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationKaplinsky, R., D. McCormick & M. Morris (2007) The impact of China on sub-Saharan Africa. Working paper series, 291. Brighton: IDS.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/4142
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the rapidly-growing links between China and SSA. The spotlight is placed on three vectors of interaction – trade, foreign investment and aid. Chinese involvement in Africa is driven predominantly by the quest for material inputs (oil and other primary commodities) required for its infrastructural investments and booming manufacturing sector. At least in the early years of this involvement, there appears to be close coordination between Chinese involvement in these three related vectors. Chinese involvement in SSA has important policy implications for growth, distribution and policy. Whilst it has provided a spur for some of SSA’s key commodity exporting economies, its impact on manufacturing (both that destined for domestic and export markets) has been adverse. Even some of the benefits of the commodity price boom are ambiguous, since these are often associated with rising exchange rates, corruption and violent conflict. Commodity-based production also has adverse distributional impacts when compared to manufacturing. The rapid growth and significance of enhanced Chinese participation in SSA has important implications for both future research (there are large unknowns and the picture is changing so rapidly) and for a poverty-focused policy agenda. Keywords: China; sub-Saharan Africa; trade; investment; textiles.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherIDSen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDS working papers;291
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectAiden_GB
dc.subjectDevelopment Policyen_GB
dc.subjectFinanceen_GB
dc.subjectTradeen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of China on sub-Saharan Africaen_GB
dc.typeIDS Working Paperen_GB
dc.rights.holderInstitute of Development Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.koha171334


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