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dc.contributor.authorVenkatanarayana, Motkuri
dc.coverage.spatialIndiaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-14T14:43:22Z
dc.date.available2013-10-14T14:43:22Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationVenkatanarayana, Motkuri (2005) On the non-random distribution of educational deprivation of children in India. CDS working papers, no.372. Trivandrum: CDS.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/3077
dc.description.abstractThe emphasis on education assumes importance given the recent recognition of human capital, human rights and human development perspectives of development. Hence educational deprivation is recognised as the primary agent of human deprivation and all necessary measures are required to ensure minimum education for every child. Such a universal recognition emanates from the given magnitude of educationally deprived children all around the world. On this premise, this is an attempt at examining the levels and inequities associated with the phenomenon of educational deprivation of children during 1990’s in India. This exercise provides a detailed exposition of the household characteristics of the deprived children based on information obtained in National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO). The persistence of educational deprivation among children in India is due to socio-economic deprivation in general; however, it remains debatable but whether the remedy lies in making the schooling provision universal. This paper argues that the provision may be necessary but not a sufficient condition to accomplish the dream goal of universal elementary education. Alternatively it argues for a greater role of the state to ensure the enabling conditions in the household domain; in other words, the state has the responsibility of ensuring the well-being of all children on an equal footing. The state’s responsibility is of equal importance of that of the parents. Key Words: India, Deprivation, Educationally Deprived Children, and Child Labour, Educational Inequalities, Group Inequalities. JEL Classification : I 2, I 20, I 28, R 12, J 21, J 23en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherCentre for Development Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCDS working papers;372
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_GB
dc.subjectChildren and Youthen_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectRightsen_GB
dc.titleOn the non-random distribution of educational deprivation of children in Indiaen_GB
dc.typeSeries paper (non-IDS)en_GB
dc.rights.holderCentre for Development Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.externalurihttp://www.cds.edu/outreach/publications/working-papersen_GB


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