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dc.contributor.authorShen, Wei
dc.contributor.authorXie, Lei
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-19T10:49:53Z
dc.date.available2019-03-19T10:49:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-19
dc.identifier.citationShen, W. an Xie, L. (2019) 'Can China Lead in Multilateral Environmental Negotiations? Internal Politics, Self-Depiction, and China’s Contribution in Climate Change Regime and Mekong Governance', Eurasian Geography and Economics,en
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/14417
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of China’s intensified efforts to engage in regional and global environmental governance is widely noted and debated. With rapidly increasing economic and political influence, China has been gradually changing its attitude and strategy in negotiations over some of the most challenging cross-border environmental crises. In this paper, we examine two cases of multinational environmental negotiations, where China exhibited leadership potential and efforts, namely the climate change regime and Mekong river governance system. Our analysis focuses both on the leadership activities around institutional, moral, and financial contributions to the governance regime, and on the efforts for China to take up exemplary actions at domestic level. We argue that in both cases, China exhibited both determination and commitment to shape the course and outcome of the negotiations, whilst applying two clearly different strategies. In the case of climate change, China is using its entrepreneur power to facilitate the deals and portray itself as the moral leader of the climate change course, while in the Mekong river case, financial and institutional inputs are the major instruments for Chinese to assume the leadership role. Yet in both cases, China exhibited a notable shift from an un-cooperative and coercive veto power to a more constructive player in the multinational environmental negotiations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Onlineen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Walesen
dc.rights.urihttps://www.ids.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/IDSOpenDocsExternalDocuments.pdfen
dc.subjectClimate Changeen
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.titleCan China Lead in Multilateral Environmental Negotiations? Internal Politics, Self-Depiction, and China’s Contribution in Climate Change Regime and Mekong Governanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holder© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Groupen
dc.identifier.externalurihttps://rsa.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15387216.2019.1586557?journalCode=rege20#.XJDKTKDgqUk
dc.identifier.teamGreen Transformationsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15387216.2019.1586557
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-02-19
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten
rioxxterms.versionNAen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/15387216.2019.1586557en
rioxxterms.funder.projectd218e59e-c0fb-4cb3-8a07-92a57da72cd1en


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