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dc.contributor.authorAlfy, Akram
dc.coverage.spatialEgypten
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-19T15:50:41Z
dc.date.available2016-05-19T15:50:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/11621
dc.description.abstractThe dominance of a generation of combat age, high levels of education combined with high unemployment, failed cities, and the relatively long duration of the transitional period still constitute an appropriate atmosphere for the explosion of a new wave of youth violence in the Middle East. The author takes Egypt as a case study. Egypt witnessed an unprecedented spike in violence following the revolution of January 25, 2011. This article first examines the political violence through the lens of political demography, drawing partly on Henrik Urdal’s theses on the impact of demographic factors on the risk of political violence, but more broadly documents and analyses the trajectory of youth movements’ involvement with violence in relation to issues of employment, education and urbanisation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Development Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIDS Bulletin;47.3
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original authors and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/IDSOpenDocsStandardTermsOfUse.pdfen
dc.subjectPolitics and Poweren
dc.titleRethinking the Youth Bulge and Violenceen
dc.typeSeries paper (IDS)en
dc.rights.holderInstitute of Development Studiesen
dc.identifier.teamPower and Popular Politicsen
dc.identifier.doi10.190881968-2016.146


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