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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hymon T.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:51:35Z
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:51:35Z
dc.date.issued1975-10
dc.identifier.citationJohnson, Hymon T. (1975) A non-individualist note on traditional motivation theories in the context of African organizations. Working paper no. 240, Nairobi: Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/handle/123456789/1125
dc.description.abstractThe physiological, psychological and sociological bases of motivation provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms used in the West to provide workers with a sense of belongingness and inducement for increased productivity. But while the various theories put forth by organizational behaviourists in their human relations approach to managing do provide logical assessments and a systematic view of motivational phenomena, the application to African organizations may not be effectively possible or conducive due to different objective and subjective conditions. Truly collectivist-based societies appear to provide the framework for a different way of looking at motivation through a more scientific and systematic approach.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherInstitute for Development Studies, University of Nairobien_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers.;240
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_GB
dc.subjectWork and Labouren_GB
dc.titleA non-individualist note on traditional motivation theories in the context of African organizationsen_GB
dc.typeSeries paper (non-IDS)en_GB
dc.rights.holderInstitute for Development Studies, University of Nairobien_GB
dc.identifier.blds322278


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